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Good Company Presents: Guest List

August 17th, 2017 - Posted by willski in LINE Skis News, LINE Team News


Tom Wallisch and Good Company release the trailer to their newest film, Guest List


With a all-star cast including Khai Krepela, Karl Fostvedt, Thayne Rich, Mike Hornbeck, and many, many others, Tom Wallisch and his production crew have just released their trailer for the newest Good Company Ski Film. Entitled Guest List, this guaranteed banger features some of the heaviest urban spots, untouched BC Zones, and raddest park shoots ever to grace the silver screen.

Because of record snowfalls across the entire western part of the US, the boys were able to get an early start. First, they headed to South Dakota, where Tom and Dale Talkington took to some high consequence — and high speed — urban features across the windswept Northern Plans Landscape.

Meanwhile, Thayne Rich, Karl Fostvedt, and upcoming big-mountain ripper Lucas Wachs pushed the envelope in Big Sky Country (that’s Montana for those unaware). Like many film crews before, these three posted up in Cook City, Southwest Montana’s hoboacking sledneck haven. And they systematically tore apart the mini-golf zones and all-time classic jump sites.

But like any Good Company Film, the park shoots stole the show. Piecing together shoots in Sun Valley and Seven Springs, Wallisch brought together the entire squad for post season domination. The jump showcase in Sun Valley is sure to impress, and the massive wedge built in Seven Springs is sure to go down as one of the best ever.

So tune in to the trailer and be on the lookout for additional content in the weeks ahead. And be sure to sag your copy of this sure-to-be instant classic.

 

Zermatt Glacier Days: Episode 3.1

July 24th, 2017 - Posted by willski in Event Coverage, LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

Sami Ortlieb, Will Wesson and Crew Head Back To Zermatt


Oh, how quickly time passes. Yet here we stand with the start of the third season of the Zermatt Glacier Days. With filmer and scoring extraordinaire, Jeff Kohnstamm at the helm, the boys produced this rad piece of summer feel good shredding. Check out the lines Sami puts down, and don’t miss Will’s subtle rail trickery.

 

But above all, this rad little slice of Swiss life highlights the insane mountain landscape of the Alps. Massive glaciers, high alpine lakes, and a hefty dose of surreal high alpine wilderness. If that — combined with a rad summer park — doesn’t make you want to drop everything and head to Switzerland, nothing will.

Tom Wallisch X Good Company in Mammoth Unbound

July 11th, 2017 - Posted by willski in Event Coverage, LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

 


Tom Wallisch and Dale Talkington head to Mammoth for Some Slushy Spring Park Laps with Good Company

 

 

With an absolutely absurd snowpack from the best winter in recent years, Mammoth quickly became THE destination for early summer park laps. The infamous Mammoth Unbound Terrain Park is home to one of the best parks in the world. And Tom and Dale made quick work of it.

All shot and cut by the discerning eye of AJ Dakoulas from Good Company, this short segment offers smooth follow cams and the classic desaturated 4bi9 aesthetic. Toss in some good old fashion rail wizardry by two of the best in the game, and boom; there’s no doubt that this will be one of those edits you bookmark. Watch Dale destroy the iconic (but recently rebuilt as a tube?) Mammoth Deck Rail. Check out that absolutely mental straight left ten cuban. And oh yeah, did you catch the ABM backslide briebe continuing cameo?

But there’s no doubt that Tom puts in down. With his signature effortless landings, capped blunts, and flawless right 9s, tom puts it down with the style we’ve come to expect out of the Pittsburgh native. From filthy, high speed rail tricks, to floaty switch dubs, Tom puts it down.

So why are you still reading this? watch the darn thing already! And Check out Tom’s Ski here to get the tools you need to stomp as hard as Wallisch himself.

A post shared by Tom Wallisch (@twallisch) on

A post shared by Tom Wallisch (@twallisch) on

LINE Mountain Command Season Roundup

July 7th, 2017 - Posted by willski in Event Coverage, LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

Check Out Five Season Edits from the International LINE Mountain Command


The LINE Mountain Command, the legions of local rippers the world over, have been a mainstay of the LINE program from the beginning. Whether they’re lapping the big line at Breckenridge, piecing together lines at the plaza-inspired Sugarbush Parks, or hiking sketchy double kinks in Austria, the LINE MC operates within the core of current skiing.

 

And as the summer rolls around, the Skiers of the LINE Mountain Command invariably get to work, piecing together season edits of their winters spent chasing skiing — whatever that might mean to them. So we took a small spattering of some of our favorite season edits (so far), and grouped them together for your viewing pleasure. Each one, unique in it’s own right, highlights different regions and styles of skiing. Kick back and enjoy — we know you will.

 

1) Thomas Trifonitchev – Germany

With silky smooth style, lazy sets, and some damn good grabs, German Thomas Trifonitchev’s season edit is rad. Every set is proper. Thomas has that classic and timeless approach to park skiing. Check out his edit, filmed mainly in Austria. Check out that Flat 5 early slap across the rainbow rail!

 

2) Charlie Dayton – Vermont

There’s no denying that Vermont holds a special place in LINE’s heart. For many years, we called Burlingon, Vermont home, and the area has long been a stronghold of LINE Mountain Command Skiers. Heck, Most of the Rebel Base (all those nerds working at LINE behind the scenes) called Sugarbush their home mountain at some point. Charlie keeps that train going, but embodies the skate-inspired style that dominates Vermont ski culture.

 

3) Peter Koukov – Colorado

If you roll up to Keystone or Breckenridge, Colorado on any given day, the park will be overrun by talented comp kids, training their t-set dub tens and unnatural 9s. And then there’s Peter Koukov. With dad shades and track jackets, he’s that guy skiing mach-a-billion into flat rails, and skying backflips off of barrel bonks. This young buck treads that line between swerve skiing and the more traditional — and has more fun than you while doing it.

4) Fabio Doberauer – Austria

With some reckless behavior, sketchy urban setups, and an utter lack of fear, Fabio Doberauer brings the reckless element into his skiing. Check out some of those bails; he’s fully committed. Skiing out of the one and only Absolut Park in Austria, Fabio is holding it down both in the streets and on the massive jumpline at Austria’s best park.

 

 

5) Peyben – Sweden

Par Hagglund is the main member of the Bunch Family, but before the norm-core troupe of skiers came together at Space Camp (no joke), Par was one of the best up-and-coming ski racers in Sweden. In Peyben in the Park II, Par demonstrates his uncanny ability to twist, swerve, and defy physics on even the most basic features. Maybe one day, Par will take it one step further and produce an entire edit leaving the ground.

 

 

Stay tuned for more season edits and segments as the months roll on.

The Peyben Takes Over Windells Session One

June 28th, 2017 - Posted by willski in LINE Skis News, LINE Team News


 

Swerving With The Peyben and The Bunch in Oregon

Under sunny skies and skyrocketing temperatures, Windells Camp kicked off the summer of 2017 in style. With Par “The Peyben” Hagglund — alongside Magnus Graner and LSM — hosting the camp for their signature Takeover Sessions, The first week of Windells was marked by swervy good vibes.

 

Get stoked and Sign up for Camp! There are only a few spots left!

Woodward at Copper X LINE Skis

June 12th, 2017 - Posted by willski in Event Coverage, LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

Will Wesson and Crew Take Over Session 1 of Woodward at Copper


 

 

While much of the country has hung up their skis for the summer, Will Wesson and a grip of LINE Skiers take to the perfectly manicured Woodward at Copper set up. Check out the recap video!

 

Zermatt Glacier Days with Sami, Rob, and Will

May 22nd, 2017 - Posted by willski in LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

Will Wesson, Sami Ortlieb, and Rob Heule take to Switzerland!

The three LINE skiers take on the Matterhorn for the first installment of Zermatt Glacier Days.

 


 

 

The end of April usually marks the end of many skier’s season. But with a strong late season in the Alps, LINE Skiers Rob Heule and Will Wesson hopped a plane to Switzerland to meet up with Sami Ortlieb in Switzerland. Awaiting them, in the vibrant mountain town of Zermatt, was arguably the best spring park in the world. Over the years, these three have produced the  Zermatt Glacier Days Video Series, a webisode series shot exclusively at the area’s summer operation. But with the opportunity to ski an even bigger park and more snow at their disposal, the boys geared up for an April session.

 

It seems like a fitting location for these three skiers. With discerning eyes, smooth style, and a creative outlook, Sami, Rob, and Will had the ideal park for imparting their particular brand of skiing. The shapers at Zermatt pieced together a flowy, seemingly endless park with tons of lines and features — through which the guys were able to lap to their hearts content.

Rob Plants a Hand

Rob Plants a Hand

But perhaps our favorite bit of content from this epic spring park trip was the train produced though the whole park. Spanning nearly four minutes, Rob, Will, and Sami, alongside Russian technician Andrey Anufriev, pass the camera back and forth as they bop from feature to feature. And the bit starts of with a bang as Rob blasts a proper nose butter seven off of seemingly nothing.

 

The squad will be grouping back up throughout the summer. So keep your eyes out for more creative, Blend-bending action!

Not Over It with Colter Hinchliffe

May 12th, 2017 - Posted by willski in LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

Colter Hinchliffe Feeds the Stoke!

While many of us have moved past the ski season, the Aspen Local is just getting started. Putting the easy, fun-fueled resort days behind him, Colter sets his sights a bit further. Often times, Colter checks in with some rambling post about a half-crocked mission — usually involving his dirtbike and a TON of walking — to bag some remote and rarely skied peak.

This year is no different; The lifts have shut down, but Colter is — perhaps unsurprisingly — Not Over It. We reached out to Colter and ask him to recount one of his favorite late season missions. Oh, and while you’re at it, enter the LINE Not Over It Photo Contest. Maybe you can snag a pair of LINE Sick Day Tourists for those late season pushes.


The Impulse

It’s 9 PM in Aspen, Colorado. I can’t take my eyes off the sky. I’m looking for the stars. If I see what I’m looking for, I will toss my skis in my truck next to my dirt bike and begin my journey no later than 11pm. All I need is a weather window.

Our lift served skiing came to an end only a few days ago here in Aspen Snowmass. We are one of the later operations to shut off the lifts – especially with the bonus week tacked on. But with a healthy snowpack and longer days ahead, I am Not Over It – I never am. My love for skiing gets me out searching for turns amongst the rocks as early as September and as late as July here in the high mountains of the Colorado Rockies.

Colter and Tim Durtschi Take on Moab

More often than not, I find myself walking. It’s not easy; it’s type 2 fun at best and often type 3. Walking with my skis, boots, skins, crampons, ice axe, full water bottle, lunch, camera, shovel, probe, first aid kit, and more strapped to my back. But the with prospect of harvesting high-alpine turns in new zones, I find myself walking – usually at 1 in the morning – with all of my gear strapped to my back. It’s for the love of it, right? Something like that.

The slogs – those long days deep in the mountains have become a staple of my spring. Last May, I decided to capitalize on this, and even pieced together a project, Sandstone and Snow. We skied the north face of Mt. Tukuhnikivatz – a technical climb and ski that involved a dicey rappel mid-line – and I was still hungry for more.So as I left behind those sandstone cliffs of the La Sal Mountains, I started scheming, plotting my next mission.

 

LONE CONE

My route home took me south of the La Sal Mountains towards Telluride and the San Juan mountains of Southern Colorado. Late in the afternoon I came into the town of Naturita. To the south, a striking peak rose out of the horizon, basking in the last light. It looked like a mini volcano. I saw a sign for the local forest service office and pulled up, looked at a map outside and quickly learned that the mountain was aptly named Lone Cone with a summit elevation of 12,618 ft.

I wasn’t planning on skiing anything on the way back to Aspen – my thoughts were focused on peaks closer to home – but the weather was nice, and I didn’t have a reason to book it home. My thoughts quickly focused on a solo mission. But I was hungry, and I don’t think well when I’m hungry. Or if I have to pee really bad. So I went and got a slice of pizza on Main Street in Naturita as I contemplated my next move.

 

In the end I decided I might as well give it a shot. I ordered a couple extra sliced of pizza for the road and followed National Forest Access signs towards Lone Cone in the fading light. Eventually the road got muddy and rutted out, and I decided to find a flat spot and call it a night. It would be the farthest my truck would go. I pulled my dirt bike out of my truck, pitched my tent, and scarfed down one last slice of ‘za.

#notoverit-not-over-it

Not a bad place to start the day. Photo: Colter Hinchliffe

I slept in – a rare occurrence on these adventures. I planned on skiing the North Face of Lone Cone. The couloir itself that had a big wall that would shade the slope well into the afternoon. Corn o’clock is a fickle and fleeting beast, and too many times I’ve found myself too early or late to actually harvest her bounty. So I chanced it with a late start, departing shortly before sunrise.

I only made it a few miles on my dirtbike before I had to switch to foot power. So, like many of these half-crocked ideas, I soon was hoofing it with all my gear loaded on my back, trudging through the low angle flanks of this volcanic megalith. For what seemed like an eternity, I stumbled around, unable to see the objective. I was navigating off of pure luck and hope. But I’ve made enough wrong turns in my life to trust my instincts, and sure enough, I crested into the basin of my planned ascent route.

#notoverit3-not over it

Pushing the West Ridge of Lone Cone

I kept moving up the west ridge. I switched from skins to crampons and began directly ascending the ridge, front-pointing most of the climb. The breeze kept things firm, and I was in no hurry; so naturally I took a bunch of selfies with my go-pro. GTS at all costs, am I right?! There’s something enjoyable about being alone in the mountains. I can move at my own pace, chose my own route, listen to music, and waste as much time as I want taking stupid pictures.

I dilly dally’ed my way to the top of the frozen Lone Cone hoping the sun would begin to do its thing, gracing me with soft corn to plunder. But it never did. I dropped into that North facing couloir around noon and skied frozen snow 1500 feet – not exactly the reward I was expecting. The angle finally eased and the snow began to soften for another 500-1000 feet of mellower skiing into the basin that drains the north face.

I followed the basin and followed it and followed it until it ran out of snow. It was only this point I realized how far west I had travelled. I would have to backtrack to my campsite – plus the additional 2 miles to my dirtbike. So I ditched my gear and moved quickly on the road with no weight. At camp, I re-hydrated, switched from ski boots to hiking boots, and jogged up to my dirtbike. By late afternoon I was rambling back down the muddy road with the Lone Cone in my rear view mirror. Satisfied, relieved, and happy that I just went for it.

Looking Ahead

As for now, it’s 10 PM here in Aspen, and the stars are not shining. In fact, its snowing. It looks like I will be sleeping tonight. But the entirety of #NotOverIt season lies ahead. I am just beginning to feel the inspiration to endure early mornings, long days, and less-than-great snow. I know the inspiration to push onward and upward will come. It always does. I usually just need to see a mountain to light the fire.

not over it

 

How Not Over It are you? Check out the LINE Not Over it Photo Contest on Facebook. Upload a shot of you showcasing how far you’d go to get your summer shred on, and enter to win a pair of LINE Sick Day Tourists!

LINE Colorado MC’s Take On Summit County

May 8th, 2017 - Posted by willski in LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

IDC: Kerrency X Egg

Mountain Command Skiers Shut Down Colorado

 

 

Carson Kerr and Peter Koukov teamed up to create a banger edit out in Summit County Colorado. These two Mountain Command Skiers ski aggressively and put down both heavy and creative tricks on their LINE Blends. Tune in and embrace the strange!

 

Hadley Hammer

April 4th, 2017 - Posted by willski in LINE Skis News, LINE Team News

Screen Shot 2017-04-21 at 1.06.24 PM

click here to read over on features.lineskis.com 

It’s a sunny day in Late February. Teems of tourists and locals alike lounge around the revamped Jackson Hole base area. A local cover band cranks out yacht rock. It’s the ski world’s ideal. Amongst it all sits Hadley Hammer, professional skier and Jackson local, taking in the scene.Jackson has long been at the center of Hadley’s life, and the ease with which she navigates it is apparent.

But it wasn’t always the case. For years, Hadley lived on the east coast, first for college in New Hampshire, and later in Washington, DC.  A far cry from rallying classic Teton lines and pushing the frontier of women’s freeskiing, that’s for sure. Skiing was put on the backburner. But like many, that siren song rings loud, and Hadley headed home – and shifted focus towards skiing.

After a stint chasing pow across Europe on the Freeride World Tour, Hadley returned home – and promptly started shooting with Teton Gravity Research. Since then,it’s been game on. Between knocking lines off the ever-expanding tick list, rallying human-powered expeditions in Alaska, and even producing a syndicated podcast, Hadley has carved out a niche for herself within the evolving landscape of skiing.

dero

I feel like I have two lives. I grew up in Jackson, so I still have a few friends from highschool, and my family is still here. But I live in a cabin at the base of TetonVillage. I’ve got my life at the mountain, and then my life in town.

The Community aspect is still here, but it definitely feels like a different place. There’s a new kind of wealth – a different kinds of families are moving in.

But my hobbies are the same as they’ve always been. Climbing, hiking, skiing, camping – I’ve always loved those activities and will continue to. Jackson has all of those things right in our backyard.

I think it’s the best skiing in the US by far. I can’t imagine skiing anywhere else betweentrips. It’s got the best terrain, amazing snow, and the proximity to Teton National Park is insane. You can’t get that in Salt Lake.

Here, it’s just…Game on. There are so many shredders. You’ve essentially got to sprint to the top of the line, and block others from skiing it while cameras line up. It’s hard to keep the logistics of setting up a shot overshadow the actual skiing.

And this year, it’s like a different mountain. There’s just so much snow. I had to take about two weeks off, and then a crazy storm came through and knocked out power for almost a week.

I got gnarly frostbite on my toes while I was taking an Avalanche II/III course. My feet are always cold, so I didn’t think much of it. But by the time I took my boot off, my toes were black. It definitely set me back for a bit.

By the time I could ski again, I was blown away. Expert Chutes were practically a groomer. All the hits I always go to first to get by jumping legs back that are mellow don’t even exist. It’s been crazy.

The kids around here are so fun to ski with, too. I’m not coaching or anything; I just randomly link up with the kids from the program every now and then.

They remind you it’s really not that serious. It’s just about having fun in the mountains. Plus, they make me jump off of stuff I wouldn’t otherwise. They’ll look at hits, and all I’m thinking is, “the landing looks a little flat, and I’m a little older.” But it’s good to tap into that feeling.

I have been focusing on filming around Jackson. We filmed almost every day for a month and a half straight. A lot of those days were super productive.

But we haven’t seen the sun in so long. It keeps everyone out of the higher alpine zones. There are a couple of lines that I still want to get on, but I’ll have to wait for the sun to come back.

I’m splitting my time filming for TGR and the ESPN Real Resort Contest. I had hoped to travel more, but since everything has been so good in Wyoming this year, it’s kind of hard to leave.

There’s this small moment where you stand on top of a face, knowing that you have two minutes to show just how good you really can be on skis. I can’t really swing competing on the Freeride World Tour anymore, but covering the event for Powder allows me to tap into the scene that was so instrumental in my career.

hadleyfeature

I had 14 hours to make the trip to Alaska happen. I was at the LINE Sring Break 2016, and I got a call from The North Face asking if I could get to AK in two days.

They Just sent me a photo of the face. It’s called Corrugated. I’d never seen anything like it before. It looked insane, but I was down. I didn’t even know if I’d be able to ski ia spine, but I figured there was only one way to find out.

Oh, and we were going to approach by snowmobile and by foot, so there was  that, too.

We sat in the RV for 25 days. The weather was awful. But finally, we got a three-day weather window. So we set out on the snowmobiles until we got the point where we had to start touring.

I was straddling a generator in this plastic sled trying to ski across this glacier to set up camp. It was the hardest workout I’ve ever had.

The next day, we got on top of the line, and skied it. If it wasn’t for Sam Anthematten, I don’t think it would have happened.

It was a struggle just to get onto the face. Sam had to dig through this massive cornice. The runnels were super icy, and there was a massive crevasse towards the bottom.

You could see the bottom of the line from the drop-in point. So steep. And I’d never even skied a spine before.

I had been standing up there for almost eight hours before I dropped. I almost backed out. But after all of that effort to get there, I wasn’t going to back off.

You feel the gravity as it pulls you down the face; I’ve never experienced that before. Plus, it was waist deep snow, so it was this really heady experience.

I just tried to survive it. I knew I wasn’t going to rip it. I focused on descending.

It looks so easy to ski spines. You see guys like Ian McIntosh and Sage just rip these fluted spines, but it’s so hard. There’s no way to learn that style of skiing besides actually going to Alaska.

And I’m hooked. It’s all I want to do. Go back to Alaska and really learn what they’re all about.

That process it what skiing is all about: constantly learning. There will always be skills that I want to learn and develop so I can keep doing this.

hadleyfeaturez

I can’t imagine what it would have been like if I didn’t come back to Jackson. I did my two years in a city, staring at a computer screen all day.

I lived in Adams Morgan in Washington, D.C. I had studied hotel management, and I was offered a job in D.C.

I was so poor — my rent was 1,500 a month — and we got by. We didn’t have AC, we kept the lights off; you know, typical dirtbag existence. I just happened to be in a major city.

Having a business background has helped so much. I know how to navigate discussions; I’ve made a spreadsheet before. It sound silly, but that’s half of it.

Especially to make it in a place like Jackson. It’s so expensive, and I know I can’t ride it out solely off of skiing.

I wanted to have something that was stimulating outside of skiing, so I started the podcast about women in non-traditional sports.

It’s called Nasicaa Cast. Powder picked it up, and now I’m focusing on Women within skiing. There are all of these women crushing it in all aspects of skiing, and I’d like to tell their stories.

Creating that back and forth is pretty difficult without losing that storytelling aspect. I think it’s important to develop these mediums, because you get more of the actual stories.

The Podcast has led to other opportunities, too. I’m going to Europe to cover the Freeride World Tour Finals in Verbier for Powder Magazine.

I’ll head to Chamonix after the competition, which I’m excited about. I love travelling around Europe.The terrain is so fun, and culturally, it’s pretty special.

And I’d like to head south to Argentina or Chile again in the summer time. I’ve gone the past two years for essentially their entire winter.

I feel so thankful that this is my life now, especially since I’veseen the other side. I’ve lived the career track lifestyle. Now, My job is to go skiing, and I live in Jackson. How cool is that?! I couldn’t think of anything better.

 

CHECK OUT WHAT IS IN HADLEY’S QUIVER:

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